• Stuart Keer-Keer
    18
    Are there any guidance documents relating to hours of work. I am aware that truck drivers have limitations on how many hours they can work in a 24 hour period. Is there any other documents around how long a person needs to be away from work before they can return to work.

    We have a procedure on management of fatigue but we dont specify how much break you must have between work shifts.
  • Andrew
    305
    Very much situational specific.
    For example I may have a person live 5 minutes away and another 1 hour away. An "8 hour away from work break" statement doesn't work.
  • Aaron Marshall
    49
    As Andrew said, its very job and person specific.
    The civil aviation advisory circular is here: https://www.aviation.govt.nz/rules/advisory-circulars/show/AC119-2
    There are different levels, depending on crew, operation type, etc. Some operations don't have rules regarding flight and duty time, as the risk resulting from a fatigue crew is low enough that legislation isn't considered appropriate (flight training is one of them, as you generally have a second pilot on board.

    This is one area where you can readily get beyond 'reasonably practicable' with your risk mitigation strategies. e.g. it is not financially tolerable for individual helicopter operators to get an individualized fatigue management procedure. It has been left to the industry body to do this so that the cost is spread.
  • Jane
    3
    I have just been looking at fatigue as a critical risk for our people who cover a 24 hour rotating roster, and one of the previous posts on this forum suggested this as a good place to start thinking https://www.zeroharm.org.nz/resources/risk/fatigue-risk-management/
    (the original thread https://forum.safeguard.co.nz/discussion/comment/1375)

    This is a general answer to your specific question though.
  • Jessie Bernard
    2
    Hi Stuart
    Our drivers are allowed to legally work for 13 hours maximum in any one given shift but after 51/2 hours they have a 1/2 hour break, and after the next 5 1/2 hours they have another 1/2 break. They mostly drive 9-10 hours on their shifts but must log in their breaks and take them. They are also trained on managing fatigue and how to manage long shifts and manage working through the night. Some start at 2am, some at 3am and some later.
  • Jessie Bernard
    2
    Hi Stuart
    Our drivers are allowed to legally work for 13 hours maximum in any one given shift but after 51/2 hours they have a 1/2 hour break, and after the next 5 1/2 hours they have another 1/2 break. They mostly drive 9-10 hours on their shifts but must log in their breaks and take them. They are also trained on managing fatigue and how to manage long shifts and manage working through the night. Some start at 2am, some at 3am and some later.
  • Dianne Campton
    43
    We need to focus on fatigue issues around work rather than focusing on hours worked. There is employment legislation which gives direction (albeit loose) to cover hours of work before breaks are required.
    We should be focusing on the type of work being carried out, the environment the work is in and the hours worked up until now as it all contributes to the risk of fatigue.

    I find encouraging people to make sure any travel and set up time is included in their work day and should be noted on their H&S documentation is a good way of opening peoples eyes to fatigue issues.
    As H&S professionals we have the opportunity of encouraging people to make the most of their breaks between shifts to rest, relax and recharge.

    Human Resources should be engaged in any conversation around shift and break periods so there is a joined up conversation.
  • Stuart Keer-Keer
    18
    Thank you all for the information provided. I have learnt more than I expected. Aaron your information on the flight crews is interesting. They are very prescriptive and detailed hours of rest and breaks. Jane the link to Professor Drew Dawson is priceless. Of considerable value and I will get our team to watch this at our next team meeting. It really reinforces the need to manage fatigue. Jessie thanks for the information on truck drivers. 13 hours max and 5.5 hours then you have to have a break. Dianne thanks for the comments on fatigue. I agree we need to manage this and it goes hand in hand with the message from Professor Drew Dawson.
  • Aaron Marshall
    49

    There is now a move away from prescription-based FRMS, and each operator/operation type is now starting to have to come up with its own scheme for approval for their own operational profile. i.e. the fatigue profile is different for a pilot flying long-haul international when compared to one who is flying regional flights.
  • Brendon Ward
    4
    This is one reason why I don't like the prescription model around break times etc... it should be based a. on good faith relationships b. the nature of the work...
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