• Stuart Keer-Keer
    22
    o4lpi8c94qmuslbd.jpg

    I think this sign was highly effective, telling people why to keep to the speed limit. At the Tannery in Christchurch.
  • Craig Marriott
    173
    I will defer to the likes of @Karl Bridges on the psychology of this, but it seems to me a bad idea to normalise seeing children in the road that you don't have to react to.
  • MattD2
    129
    but it seems to me a bad idea to normalise seeing children in the road that you don't have to react to.Craig Marriott
    Or the potential to be distracted from an actual risk by the sign, or to cause evasive action that results in an incident to happen if surprised by the sign...
    I wonder how much more some speed bumps or other similar physical (engineering) controls would have been for the car park?
  • Steve H
    27
    I wonder how much more some speed bumps or other similar physical (engineering) controls would have been for the car park?MattD2

    That seems to be something that is conspicuously lacking with a lot commercial/retail zones, rather than have dedicated flow in, circulate around and then flow out, the theory appears to be how many collision points/ blind spots and combined entry/exit points (entering vehicles turning right and exiting ones doing the same) can we create.

    I like the roadworks sign that says "Slow down, my Dad works here", was impressed by the plonker that overtook us driving through some of the EQ remedial work on SH1 just south of Kaikoura after we had just passed that sign.
  • Karl Bridges
    21
    Hi Craig, Thanks for the mention. I think you hit the nail on the head to some extent but I would hope that common sense would prevail. There is research to suggest that when individuals are in a heightened state of risk, their behaviour is more cautious. Although that is subject to debate and very much focused on context.

    I can imagine that a car driver seeing this for the first time would be initially startled which could distract them from other things, maybe a kid attempting to cross from the other side? But then over time would get used to it and thus the effectiveness of the signage is likely to diminish.

    I would be interested in a prolonged study to measure the effectiveness of this sign on car driving and maneuvering.

    There is also the (somewhat cynical) consideration whether this car park is special in that kids are prone to run across the road, and others are not, because they do not have a sign such as this?

    And a final comment is maybe the problem resides with the kids and dare I say the parents and maybe there should be signage for the pedestrians too in a similar sort of fashion as they have with some level crossings.

    Just a few thoughts of mine at the end of a somewhat taxing day.

    Thanks again and Merry Xmas all. :D
  • Stuart Keer-Keer
    22
    In our work complex we have 40 units. Commercial and a motel. The motel has been taken over by social housing. The speed limit around the carparks is 5 km/hr. I reckon I am the only one that complies with that limit.

    Recently I was meandering along and a kid about 4 years old shot out between two parked cars. I had the time to stop. Had I been doing 20 km/hr the result would have been different. If it has happened once to me it could happen again.

    In my view as in the song, children are our the future, teach them well.......In my view they are the most precious gifts to us all. We need to protect them.

    So what can I do to change the behavior of the other 40 unit holders occupants and visitors.

    How can I prevent something bad happening. It troubles me often.

    The sign I thought was one step in the right direction. Some people see the bad in it, but what can we do to protect the kids.
  • Matt Ward
    9
    Dedicated, demarcated and physically separated zones for pedestrians and vehicles would seem the trick here Stuart. Have seen it done effectively in some carparks where guardrails guide pedestrians and prevent people crossing anywhere other than a dedicated crossing point. Relatively low cost. Signs (no matter how great) should only be supplementary to real 'hard' controls.
    I would also suggest the carpark in the photo (plus many others I come across) could benefit from a reverse parking policy. Risk is increased when exiting these places in reverse (skinful after visiting the brewery, excited to get home and try on new clothes, etc) so best to reverse in upon entry. Plus if ever need to evacuate it would be so much easier and safer.
  • Steve H
    27
    I would also suggest the carpark in the photo (plus many others I come across) could benefit from a reverse parking policy.Matt Ward

    Not enforceable in this location, a company can "require" visitors to their site park in a given manner, but in a location where joe public is going to park, it will mostly be ignored.

    Dedicated, demarcated and physically separated zones for pedestrians and vehicles would seem the trick here Stuart. Have seen it done effectively in some carparks where guardrails guide pedestrians and prevent people crossing anywhere other than a dedicated crossing point. Relatively low cost. Signs (no matter how great) should only be supplementary to real 'hard' controls.Matt Ward
    Yes, don't have store entry/exit next to a driveway, don't have long corridors that vehicles can build up speed anywhere peds are going to be. A classic fail is to have the Mall on one side of a road and a car park on the other.
  • Michael Wilson
    69
    I have seen cut outs at civil sites or mannequins in high vis. I would see this being effective short term but possible having a negative impact if left in place for a long time.

    In Japan they have silhouette cut outs with animated arms waving a beacon to have people slow down.
  • Sheri Greenwell
    196
    This could work well if they were moved around occasionally at random intervals, and perhaps changed up a bit each time.
bold
italic
underline
strike
code
quote
ulist
image
url
mention
reveal
youtube
tweet
Add a Comment

Welcome to the Safeguard forum!

If you are interested in workplace health & safety in New Zealand, then this is the discussion forum for you.