• rebecca telfer
    17
    Hi Team
    Does any member have a company fatigue management policy they would like to share.
    My main workers that would be involved with fatigue would be call out breakdown technicians for heavy vehicles.
    thanks Bex
  • Mandy Gudgeon
    4
    Happy to share some of our fantastic resources privately,
  • Steve Setterfield
    8
    Hi Bex,
    Attached might be useful
    Attachments
    AHICNZ_SP_030 Workplace Fatigue Management (193K)
    AHICNZ_SP_032 Working Outside Normal Hours (150K)
  • Christina Carroll
    5
    Some year's ago at a previous employer, we had technicians working out of town on a job that had to be completed between 5pm and 3am. It was the summer holidays and all accomodation was heavily booked. On several occasions, our techs found themselves finishing work at 3am but having to vacate the motel room at 10am. They ended up sleeping in the vehicle and expected to turn up for work in a fit state at 5pm. Management were aware of the situation but would do nothing due to project deadlines and penalty clauses. The offered use of an employee's caravan was declined because it wasn't "approved accomodation".

    I'd be interested to see if anyone has a Policy covering this scenario and how would they go about enforcing it?

    FYI the project still over-ran both costs and time.
  • Sandra Nieuwoudt
    4
    "techs found themselves finishing work at 3am but having to vacate the motel room at 10am"
    Planning would have made a huge difference e.g. arrangements with the motel, not booking with the cheapest motel available - it will come at a cost but you cannot use $ as a reason not to provide suitable accommodation. I worked in an industry before where we experienced the same problems and Managements/Project Manager H&S culture needed to be addressed and changed. It took a while but with H&S Reps, and employee engagement we changed from being reactive to proactive and management had to accept that employees value their own safety.
  • Steve H
    43
    On several occasions, our techs found themselves finishing work at 3am but having to vacate the motel room at 10am. They ended up sleeping in the vehicle and expected to turn up for work in a fit state at 5pm. Management were aware of the situation but would do nothing due to project deadlines and penalty clauses. The offered use of an employee's caravan was declined because it wasn't "approved accomodation".Christina Carroll

    Crikey, some head games going on there, a caravan wasn't suitable because it wasn't "approved accommodation" and sleeping rough in a service vehicle somehow trumps it. If it looks like male bovine excreta and it smells like male bovine excreta, someone should have called it as such.
  • Rachael
    85
    A previous employer developed a fatigue management policy which limited staff to 12 hour shifts and no more than 6 consecutive days on.

    The 3 Unions operating in the company had a collective fit.

    The policy remained as a tick box but it was never implemented.
  • Alex
    6
    I'm working in an industry when long hours and call outs may be required. We generally work under the NZTA guidelines for all workers not just the class 2 and above drivers.

    Our basic rules are no more than 13 hours work but up to a 16 hour day for emergency work. A formal stand-down is required after so many hours or after an early morning call out.
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