• Peter Bateman
    218
    In the March/April edition of Safeguard magazine we pose three questions based on stories in the magazine. One of them is this:

    Andrea Kelleher suggests a restorative justice meeting be used early in the process after a serious injury, regardless of any legal enforcement action. How useful have you found the restorative justice process?

    Feel free to respond here on the Forum, or privately here via a Survey Monkey form.

    An edited selection of responses will be published in the May/June edition, but with no names attached. One randomly selected person will receive a prize, namely a copy of the book One Percent Safer, compiled and edited by Dr Andrew Sharman.
  • Michael Wilson
    102
    Hello,

    It appears that the Survey Monkey is not working so I will write here.

    I was involved in one when a player in a sports team I coached was assaulted by his polytech tutor. He had been disruptive in class tutor had thrown something at him. The traditional piece of chalk was not at hand so he threw a hammer.

    The student had responded with a few choice words and left. The restorative justice meeting was meant for him to apologize to the tutor and discuss returning. He asked for my assistance and we ended up getting him a full refund and a transfer to another Polytech with a transfer of his credits.

    This was an example of not going in with preconceived expectations. It is tricky to balance investigation with restorative justice as the two probably need to be kept separate, however going in to a restorative justice meeting without all the facts can cause more harm than good.
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